Lessons Archive

7-6 | Best Practices for Maintaining Synthetic Rope Slings

Author: Mike Close

Maintaining a synthetic rope sling during and in between uses is the best way to help extend the life of it and help to ensure that it stays in service. Inspections are easier to perform—and probably more thorough—when slings are easily accessible and organized, kept off of the ground, and stored in a cool and dry environment.

7-5 | Disposal of Damaged / Failed Slings

Author: Mike Close

If it’s determined that the synthetic rope sling will be removed from service, we suggest cutting it down into more manageable sizes before discarding. This extra effort will help to accommodate the needs of most recycling facilities that will accept the damaged rope and also help to make sure that it cannot be used any further.

7-4 | Basic Inspection Criteria

Author: Mike Close

The goal of a sling inspection is to evaluate remaining strength in a sling which has been used previously to determine if it is suitable for continued use. When inspecting synthetic rope slings, daily visual inspections are intended to detect serious damage or deterioration which would weaken the strength and integrity of the sling.

7-1 | Who Performs Inspections and How Often?

Author: Mike Close

All synthetic rope sling inspections shall be performed by a Designated Person with any deficiencies further examined by a Qualified Person to identify hazards and determine what additional steps need to be taken to address the hazard.

6-6 | Best Practices for Maintaining Metal Mesh Slings

Author: Mike Close

Maintaining a metal mesh sling during and in between uses is the best way to help extend the life of it and help to ensure that it stays in service. Inspections are easier to perform—and probably more thorough—when slings are easily accessible and organized, kept off of the ground, and stored in a cool and dry environment.

6-5 | Disposal of Damaged / Failed Slings

Author: Mike Close

When performing a metal mesh sling inspection, you’ll want to identify a potential issue and take action on it before the sling is connected to any rigging hardware. Broken welds, broken wires, visible distortion, or damage to either fitting can compromise the strength and lifting capabilities of the sling when under load. Therefore, the sling must be removed from service immediately.

6-4 | Basic Inspection Criteria

Author: Mike Close

The goal of a sling inspection is to evaluate remaining strength in a sling which has been used previously to determine if it is suitable for continued use. When inspecting metal mesh slings, daily visual inspections are intended to detect serious damage or deterioration which would weaken the strength and integrity of the sling.