Lessons Archive

6-1 | Who Performs Inspections and How Often?

Author: Mike Close

All inspections shall be performed by a Designated Person with any deficiencies further examined by a Qualified Person to identify hazards and determine what additional steps need to be taken to address the hazard.

5-5 | Best Practices for Maintaining High Performance Roundslings

Author: Mike Close

The best way to help extend the life of a high performance roundsling, and help to ensure that it stays in service, is to properly maintain it during and in-between each use. Inspections are easier to perform—and probably more thorough—when slings are easily accessible and organized, kept off of the ground, and stored in a cool and dry environment.

5-4 | Disposal of Damaged / Failed Slings

Author: Mike Close

When performing a roundsling inspection, you’ll want to identify a potential issue and take action on it before the sling is connected to any rigging hardware. A small cut, burn, tear, or hole in a synthetic roundsling can compromise the strength and lifting capabilities of the sling when under load and therefore the sling must be removed from service immediately.

5-3 | Basic Inspection Criteria

Author: Mike Close

A key factor when inspecting high performance roundslings is being able to identify a potential issue and taking action on it before the sling is connected to any rigging hardware. A small cut, burn, tear or hole in a high performance roundsling can compromise the strength and lifting capabilities of the sling when under load, and therefore the sling must be removed from service immediately. If there is any doubt as to the condition of the roundsling prior to use, it needs to be removed from service and replaced.

5-2 | High Performance Roundsling Identification Tag Requirements

Author: Mike Close

It is the responsibility of the user to maintain the sling identification—ensuring the tag or identification is still in place and is still legible during the life of the sling. If the identification tag is missing or illegible, it is the responsibility of the inspector to remove the sling from service.

5-1 | Who Performs Inspections and How Often?

Author: Mike Close

One of the most basic but crucial aspects of using a high performance roundsling is properly inspecting it prior to each use. Taking the time to perform a brief visual inspection will confirm that the roundsling meets the specific job and lifting requirements and will also help to ensure the safety of the user, help extend the life of the equipment, and help to reduce unnecessary equipment repair costs and costly down time.

4-5 | Best Practices for Maintaining Synthetic Roundslings

Author: Mike Close

The best way to help extend the life of a synthetic roundsling, and help to ensure that it stays in service, is to properly maintain it during and in-between each use. Inspections are easier to perform—and probably more thorough—when slings are easily accessible and organized, kept off of the ground, and stored in a cool and dry environment.

4-4 | Disposal of Damaged / Failed Slings

Author: Mike Close

When performing a roundsling inspection, you’ll want to identify a potential issue and take action on it before the sling is connected to any rigging hardware. A small cut, burn, tear, or hole in a synthetic roundsling can compromise the strength and lifting capabilities of the sling when under load and therefore the sling must be removed from service immediately.