Lessons Archive

4-3 | Basic Inspection Criteria

Author: Mike Close

A key factor when inspecting synthetic roundslings is being able to identify a potential issue and taking action on it before the sling is connected to any rigging hardware. A small cut, burn, tear or hole in a synthetic roundsling can compromise the strength and lifting capabilities of the sling when under load, and therefore the sling must be removed from service immediately.

4-2 | Synthetic Roundsling Identification Tag Requirements

Author: Mike Close

It is the responsibility of the user to maintain the sling identification—ensuring the tag or identification is still in place and is still legible during the life of the sling. If the identification tag is missing or illegible, it is the responsibility of the inspector to remove the sling from service.

3-5 | Best Practices for Maintaining Alloy Chain Slings

Author: Mike Close

The best way to help extend the life of a chain sling, and help to ensure that it stays in service, is to properly maintain it during and in-between each use. Inspections are easier to perform—and probably more thorough—when slings are easily accessible and organized, kept off of the ground, and stored in a cool and dry environment.

3-3 | Basic Inspection Criteria

Author: Mike Close

Whether you’re doing rigging inspections in-house or working with a third-party rigging inspection service, it’s very important for the inspector to understand what abuse the chain is seeing and inspect it accordingly.

3-1 | Who Performs Inspections and How Often?

Author: Mike Close

OSHA states that the employer has the responsibility to inspect and document alloy chain slings at a minimum of 12-month intervals. The employer is also required to maintain a record of the most recent thorough inspection.

2-5 | Best Practices for Maintaining Synthetic Web Slings

Author: Mike Close

The best way to help extend the life of a web sling, and help to ensure that it stays in service, is to properly maintain it during and in-between each use. Inspections are easier to perform—and probably more thorough—when slings are easily accessible and organized, kept off of the ground, and stored in a cool and dry environment.

2-4 | Disposal of Damaged / Failed Slings

Author: Mike Close

If it’s determined that the web sling will be removed from service, we suggest cutting the eye in most circumstances to render the sling as unusable. When the sling body is long enough, the webbing should be cut into shorter sections, and the sling should be disposed of as general waste or trash.